We Specialise in Current, Signed, Rare and Out of Print Photobooks

Why not sign up for our free Newsletter to keep you up to date with new titles and offers.

......

Email:

First Name:

(your details are never passed to third parties and you can unsubscribe at any time)

PayPal Acceptance Mark

Find a specific Book

Find Books by your favourite photographer by clicking the letter of their surname above.

BOOK SEARCH

Authors Surnames... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z One Picture Books ...

Item Code 3632

Title Nazraeli Library set 4

Author Teemer, Steinmetz - Morell - Opie - Grannan - Banks -

Signed By The Photographer

ISBN: 0

Condition: Hard cover

PRICE.. £

IN STOCK ....



Set of Six books Each book has its own individual custom slip case and is signed and numbered in a limited edition of just 350 copies.
Each book comes in its own custom clip case In 1964, a young Steve Banks bought one of the most coveted ?Muscle Cars? on the market?a Pontiac GTO with a four-speed stick and a Hurst shifter, Tri-Power, and three Rochester 2G carburetors. He then drove Route 66 from Chicago to Los Angeles to begin his new advertising agency job.

Gassing up one day at Nobo?s Shell station at Beverly and Larchmont, Banks learned that Nobo had previously been head mechanic at the Courtesy Chevrolet dealership, and that his station had become a center for building and tuning street racers. On and off over the next few months, Banks would leave his car at the garage while Nobo fine-tuned the carburetors, replaced the stock tires, torsion, and sway bars, and added Koni shocks and a Sun tachometer. Next, he taught Banks how to ?speed shift??while making late night runs up and down Larchmont Boulevard.

One day, Nobo mentioned he was going to a drag race that Saturday, and that Banks was welcome to come along. Witnessing his first drag race, Steve Banks was immediately hooked. He returned the following Saturday, and the next, and again the next; but this time with with his cameras. Over the course of two years, Banks photographed guys preparing runs, the thundering nitro-burning dragsters launching down the strip at two hundred-plus miles per hour, and everything else that moved.

Today, fifty years later, the sport of drag racing is a big bucks, corporate-sponsored television broadcast business with the NHRA sporting over two hundred different drag racing classes. However, in a nod to the sport?s modest beginnings, almost every weekend from coast-to-coast one can find ?nostalgia racing? events preserving the dragster culture of the 1960s captured here in NITRO, Drag Racing In The Sixties: 1964?1966. ISBN 978-1-59005-480-2
Hardcover, Slipcased,
12 x 15, 60 pages,
26 duotone plates


Hundreds of Sparrows is a two-volume set of books by contemporary artist and filmmaker Katy Grannan. Volume One (NZL Set 3), and Volume Two (NZL Set 4, forthcoming) both function as stand-alone books; together, they tell a deeper story, playing off of each other and delving deeper into the lives and surroundings of their subjects. The photographs in Hundreds of Sparrows were made in the Central Valley, in particular, the sprawling cities of Modesto, Fresno, and Bakersfield that sit within this vast agricultural region in the geographical center of California. This location also served as the setting for Grannan?s debut feature film, "The Nine", which premiered to wide critical acclaim in 2016. Throughout the works, the artist explores the significance and complexity of the seemingly ordinary, the mundane and the overlooked?anonymous strangers, familiar gestures and interactions?the soundscape and theatre of nowhere. This is the other side of the American Dream. Katy Grannan?s work has been featured in exhibitions worldwide and is included in many permanent collections, including those of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and The LA County Museum of Art. Hundreds of Sparrows: Volume Two is printed in a limited edition of 350 numbered, signed and slipcased copies. ?There is gentleness in many of these pictures, and even some muted joy and understated and unconventional beauty here and there. Mostly the images seem to be infused with an invisible layer of weariness, as if that beating sun had taken its toll over the passing years on everything that absorbed its continuous waves of heat and light. It?s a view of reality that is not without hope, but one where the good times ahead may only be mirages on the horizon.? ? Collector Daily ISBN 978-1-59005-481-9
Hardcover, Slipcased,
380mm x 305 mm, 48 pages,
28 four-color plates ?I have always loved the 19th Century photographs of the American West by Carleton Watkins, Timothy O?Sullivan and William Henry Jackson but, when I had a commission to photograph these landscapes anew, the work of these men daunted me?so much so that, for a long time, I couldn?t imagine how I would approach making landscape images myself. But like many immigrants, I felt moved to explore the vastness of my adopted country.? ? Abelardo Morell Working with his assistant, C.J. Heyliger, Cuban-born artist Abelardo Morell has famously designed a light proof tent that, via periscope type optics, makes it possible to project a view of the nearby landscape onto whatever ground is under the tent. Inside this darkened space he uses a view camera to record the effect. This Tent-Camera now liberates Morell to use camera obscura techniques in a world of new places." Born in Havana, Cuba in 1948, Morell immigrated with his parents to the United States in 1962. His work has been collected and shown in many galleries, institutions and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Art Museum in New York, The Chicago Art Institute, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Houston Museum of Art, The Boston Museum of Fine Art, The Victoria & Albert Museum and over seventy other museums in the United States and abroad. ISBN 978-1-59005-482-6
Hardcover, Slipcased,
10.5 x 15, 56 pages,
22 four-color plates ?Like the Romantic painters before her, Opie expresses a desire to return to nature for quiet contemplation. She does not ask for much; she would probably photograph anything ?so long as they are wild.? While pointing at the beauty of these sights, she makes a subtle plea for environmental preservation: if society goes on operating in such an unsustainable manner, all of this is what we are poised to lose.? ? Art Asia Pacific Catherine Opie?s portrait of Yosemite National Park is meditative and personal, focusing on individual elements ? a waterfall, a tree or the expansive sky above ? rather than on the majestic impression of the place for which it is known. Indeed, when she does step back and present a wider view of the vista she is facing, she pulls it out of focus, allowing for a moment of reflection before moving on to the next photograph. While the artist first became well in the art world for her closeup, often confrontational photographs of human subjects, Opie allows the human presence to ?empty out? in her landscape photographs. As she explains in a 2001 interview with Art Journal, ?The emptiness is about loss. It?s about nostalgia . . . trying to capture, document people and places before they disappear.? In the context of nature, the emptiness conveys a longing for a time when these landscapes were untouched by mankind. One of the most influential and widely published contemporary artists of her generation, Catherine Opie has exhibited her work at the Whitney Biennial and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art in Oxford. The recipient of a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, Opie is currently a tenured professor at UCLA. ISBN 978-1-59005-483-3
Hardcover, Slipcased,
380 x 305 mm, 36 pages,
24 four-color plates ?Like the Romantic painters before her, Opie expresses a desire to return to nature for quiet contemplation. She does not ask for much; she would probably photograph anything ?so long as they are wild.? While pointing at the beauty of these sights, she makes a subtle plea for environmental preservation: if society goes on operating in such an unsustainable manner, all of this is what we are poised to lose.? ? Art Asia Pacific Catherine Opie?s portrait of Yosemite National Park is meditative and personal, focusing on individual elements ? a waterfall, a tree or the expansive sky above ? rather than on the majestic impression of the place for which it is known. Indeed, when she does step back and present a wider view of the vista she is facing, she pulls it out of focus, allowing for a moment of reflection before moving on to the next photograph. While the artist first became well in the art world for her closeup, often confrontational photographs of human subjects, Opie allows the human presence to ?empty out? in her landscape photographs. As she explains in a 2001 interview with Art Journal, ?The emptiness is about loss. It?s about nostalgia . . . trying to capture, document people and places before they disappear.? In the context of nature, the emptiness conveys a longing for a time when these landscapes were untouched by mankind. One of the most influential and widely published contemporary artists of her generation, Catherine Opie has exhibited her work at the Whitney Biennial and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art in Oxford. The recipient of a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, Opie is currently a tenured professor at UCLA. ISBN 978-1-59005-483-3
Hardcover, Slipcased,
380 x 305 mm, 36 pages,
24 four-color plates Limited edition of 350 Signed by Jack Teemers Wife Joan and numbered copies Each book comes in its own custom clip case ?Jack D. Teemer?s photographs taken in American Rust Belt cities during the 1980s examine the ways in which neighborhoods and urban infrastructure have been shaped by the industry that surrounds them. His pictures quietly celebrate the ways in which humans strive to live together in the shadow of manufacturing?even in its decline. Cinematic vistas, presenting a wide view of a city?s urban structure, set the stage for pictures that focus more narrowly on neighborhoods and individual yards. Bridges and freeways loom over homes and restaurants; fences surround each home; signs, automobiles and gardens crowd each yard; children jump from porches and play with hoses. Although many of these yards have seen better days, the diverse residents of communities who call them home cultivate and enliven their small plots of land. Teemer records these distinctive American Rust Belt stories, from the cities on the verge of economic and civic recovery to the families who live boisterously in close quarters, with great care for the human experience.? ? From the Introduction by Lisa Sutcliffe, Herzfeld Curator of Photography and Media Arts, Milwaukee Art Museum` Jack D. Teemer (1948?1992) photographed working-class neighborhoods in cities like Cincinnati, Columbus, Cleveland, and Dayton, often focusing on residential backyards. This intimate approach affords the viewer insight to various societal factors such as economic conditions and zoning, as well as revealing how individuals in dense neighborhoods shape their own private spaces through landscaping and decoration. In the early 1980s, Teemer joined an expanding group of practitioners who embraced color photography, and challenged the notion that it was somehow subservient to black-and-white photography. His work was presented alongside several preeminent color photographers such as Joel Meyerowitz, Stephen Shore, and William Eggleston in the important survey, American Independents: Eighteen Color Photographers (Eauclaire, Abbeville, 1987). Two decades later, after Teemer?s death, it was featured in, Where We Live: Photographs from the Berman Collection (Getty Trust Publications, 2006). This group exhibition and subsequent book placed Teemer?s work within a meaningful dialog with other photographers who have described aspects of the American social landscape. ISBN 978-1-59005-485-7
Hardcover, Slipcased,
12 x 15, 48 pages,
35 four-color plates

Shipping Info

Contact

Terms & Conditions